Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences Courses

This information serves as the course catalog for the MS degree in Biomedical Sciences program. In addition, the graduate student curriculum management system (CLEARvue) provides a full description of each course, course learning objectives, and course directors with their contact information in the introductory material in CLEARvue for each course. Required and recommended textbooks are listed on the internet and intranet, and updated annually. Information about other learning resources (both electronic and print) is provided to graduate students at the beginning of each year and beginning of each course. Methods of learner assessment and course grading are described in the Graduate Student Handbook.

BIOM 6111 Cellular Biochemistry
Credits:
4
Directors:
Tim Garrow
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

Cellular Biochemistry is a course that focuses on the structure and function of cells and tissues, and how nutrition and key homeostatic hormones influence how organs metabolize carbohydrates and lipids. In addition to learning about the regulatory features of energy metabolism in healthy individuals, students also learn how dysregulation of energy metabolism underlies obesity, metabolic syndrome, and disturbances in glucose metabolism including diabetes. This course also provides an introduction to regional anatomy and the basic principles of pharmacology.

BIOM 6121 Molecular Genetics
Credits:
4
Directors:
Erik Larson
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

Molecular Genetics provides a background in metabolism of small molecules and the genetic contributors to disease. Cellular pathways governing macromolecular precursor synthesis and breakdown will be covered. Basic processes of DNA, genome, and chromosome metabolism are integrated with key principles of inherited and spontaneous genetic disorders. Gene expression, developmental genetics, population genetics, infectious agents, and molecular technologies are explained to provide a framework for understanding the DNA-based contributions to human disease.

BIOM 6130 Basics of Systems Regulation
Credits:
3
Directors:
Sheakley, Gregoire-Bottex, Bauler
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

This is a three-week course that provides a fundamental understanding of molecular and physiologic processes that regulate the activity of multiple organ systems. Cellular transport of ions and molecules is introduced, emphasizing genetic and microbial diseases that interfere with the normal function of transporters. The principle of homeostasis is defined at the level of cells, tissues, organs, and the whole body, with examples to demonstrate the importance of homeostasis in the control of body function. The autonomic nervous system is described in detail and then employed as the starting point for teaching of the foundations of human pharmacology. Pharmacological principles outlined include pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, and toxicity. The course introduces the immune system, and then expands on the systemic role of inflammation in disease.

Objectives:
  • Explain how ions and molecules are transported across the cellular plasma membrane, epithelial organs, and capillaries, as well as the relevance of these processes to disease.
  • Compare and contrast anatomical imaging techniques.
  • Explain the concept of homeostasis at the cellular, tissue, organ and organism levels, including how the principles of negative and positive feedback, hierarchy, redundancy, and adaptability are integral to homeostatic control.
  • List the common parameters influencing the extracellular fluid compartment that are homeostatically regulated, and describe plasma water and salt content regulation as the basis of cellular volume control.
  • Compare and contrast the structure and function of the divisions of the autonomic nervous system, including cholinergic and adrenergic receptors, consequences of receptor dysfunction, and drugs used to manage receptor dysfunction.
  • Describe the pathophysiology of organophosphate poisoning and pheochromocytoma as related to autonomic nervous system function.
  • Describe the pharmacodynamics of drugs in terms of concentration, dose, and response.
  • Analyze pharmacological effects in terms of ligand or drug-receptor interactions and pharmacological effects in terms of drug absorption and distribution, therapeutic index, and toxicity.
  • Apply pharmacokinetic principles and data to calculate drug loading and maintenance doses, and effects of drug metabolism, excretion, and elimination effects the plasma concentration of drugs.
  • Describe the functions of the major components of the immune system.
  • Describe the immunology and pathology of inflammation, and discuss the role of NSAIDs in the treatment of inflammation.
BIOM 6150 Basics of Immunology and Infectious Diseases
Credits:
4
Directors:
Bauler
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

This is a five-week course that provides a fundamental understanding of the principles of immunology and infectious diseases, and the application of this knowledge to immunologic, infectious, and rheumatologic (collagen vascular) diseases. The course integrates immunology through microbiology and includes relevant aspects of anatomy, histology, pharmacology, and pathology. Specifically, students: (1) learn about the soluble mediators, cells, and organs of the immune system and how these elements work together to prevent and respond to infection; (2) examine how the immune system causes and contributes to diseases such as autoimmune diseases, allergy, and chronic inflammatory diseases; and (3) acquire the necessary foundational knowledge of virology, mycology, parasitology, and bacteriology to understand how infectious microbes cause organ‑specific and systemic diseases.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the development and senescence of the immune system.
  2. Describe the normal immune response to pathogenic insult and damaged or necrotic tissues.
  3. Describe the mechanisms of immune regulation.
  4. Describe the immunologic basis of diseases with an immune etiology or component.
  5. Explain the immunologic basis of vaccination, immunomodulation and immunotherpaies. 
  6. Describe the basic principles of infectious disease.
  7. Describe the methodology by which the clinical laboratory diagnoses, evaluates and monitors inflammation and infectious disease.
  8. Describe the basic biology of medically relevant infectious agents.
  9. Describe the mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis.
  10. Explain the pharmacologic principles of antimicrobial therapy.
  11. Describe the therapeutic approach to treat the pathophysiologic effects of immunologically-and microbial-based diseases.
  12. Describe the pathologic consequences of infectious and immunologically-based diseases.
  13. Descrive the common infectious diseases, ectoparasitic infestations, and inflammatory disorders of the skin.
BIOM 6210 Normal and Forensic Anatomy
Credits:
4
Directors:
Lackey
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

This is a five-week course that provides a fundamental understanding of all major anatomic structures of the human body. This course takes a systemic approach emphasizing gross anatomy and examines body systems interactions to form the functioning whole. Anatomy of organs and organ systems are correlated with physiologic functions. Imaging techniques including CT, MRI, and x‑rays are used to introduce the application of diagnostic imaging to the diagnosis of clinical disorders. Methods of forensic anatomy and anthropology are discussed in the context of the functions of the medical examiner.

Objectives:
  1. Identify and describe the gross anatomical structures of the back and thorax, abdominal wall, abdominal viscera, pelvis and reproductive organs, the upper and lower extremities, and the head and neck.
  2. Describe the forensic applications of back and thoracic skeletal anatomy, including: positive identification using standard x-ray, age-estimation, and injury patterns.
  3. Describe the forensic applications of the bony pelvis including estimation of age and sex.
  4. Describe the forensic applications of the bony extremities, including: positive identification using standard x-ray, stature estimation, and describing injury patterns.
  5. Describe the forensic applications of head and neck skeletal anatomy, including: positive identification using standard x-ray, sex and ancestry estimation, and describing injury patterns.
BIOM 6220 Histology and Cell Biology
Credits:
4
Directors:
Riddle
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

This is a five-week lecture and laboratory course directed at an understanding of the structure of cells, tissues, and organs, and the functional significance of their morphological features. This course includes laboratory sessions of observations of human tissues through the study of digitized images (virtual slides). Students learn to identify specific structures, cells, tissues, and organs, and integrate basic concepts and principles of microanatomy as related to clinical medicine.

Objectives:
  1. Describe the microanatomical organization of cells,tissues, andorgans.
  2. Correlate the normal microanatomical structure of cells, tissues, and organs with function.
  3. Describe the fundamental concepts of embryology and development.
MEDU 6701 Advances and Perspectives in Medicine and Health
Credits:
1
Directors:
Vanden Heuvel
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

This is an interprofessional seminar course for 0.5 credit per term (1 credit for the academic year). These sessions explore advances in biomedical and health sciences with translational applications to clinical medicine and the broad context of medicine in society.  Students attend a series of events that include a mixture of basic science seminars, clinical seminars, humanities lectures, workshops, plays, demonstrations, simulations, and conferences. Students submit a brief reflection for each event.

Objectives:
  1. Gain an understanding of complex issues relevant to the health care professions.
  2. Gain awareness of cross-disciplinary aspects and integration of health care teams.
  3. Express individual attitudes, feelings, and beliefs related to issues relevant to the health care professions through reflective writing assignments.
MEDU 6710 Critical Analysis of Scientific Literature
Credits:
1
Directors:
Minser, Costello
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

This course continues for the entire academic year. Students learn to critically evaluate a recent article in the scientific literature pertinent to the current basic medical science course, including articles related to biomedical ethics. Under the guidance of a faculty member, students lead the discussion of articles chosen by the faculty member. The student learns to develop learning objectives to meet their own needs, becoming adept at active and self‑directed learning.

Objectives:
  1. Explain key concepts of statistical literacy
  2. Develop basic scientific literature searching skills
  3. Critically assess scientific literature – with focus upon the reporting of: problem statement, relevance, review analysis, research design, methods analysis, quality control, and conclusions
  4. Develop the ability to assess applicability of scientific literature including current challenges in the field of basic science and potential clinical applicability
  5.  Create an engaging presentation developed from selected scientific literature
MEDU 6720 Learning Strategies
Credits:
1
Directors:
Milnes
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

This course continues for the entire academic year and provides academic development and support that continues through the duration of the degree program. The course provides ongoing one‑on‑one and group instruction in time management, stress management, study skills, learning skills, test‑taking skills, information management and library skills, and personal assessment. Under the guidance of a learning skills specialist, students develop effective study skills, test‑taking strategies and test analysis, and active learning techniques. Students develop time management strategies, including recognizing and overcoming barriers to successful time management, and how to read and study more effectively and efficiently.  In addition to the formal instruction, the learning skills specialist regularly meets with students to monitor progress and provide feedback in a supportive environment.

Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, each student will be able to:

  1. Examine ways to optimize learning.
  2. Evaluate personal barriers regarding their own student success.
  3. Develop an effective learning system for academic success.
TRAN 6700 Transition to Master of Science in Biomedical Sciences
Credits:
2
Directors:
Milnes
Grading:
Pass/Fail
Description:

This is a two-week course that prepares students to understand, participate, and connect in the MS degree in Biomedical Sciences program. Students build the foundation for their success in academics and professional relationships. During this course, students have opportunities to connect with the medical school’s services and support offices, and are introduced to student life organizations, student support services, information management, learning strategies, time management, financial aid, library skills, personal development, emotional intelligence, wellness, reflective writing, and the biomedical sciences curriculum.

Objectives:
  • Describe the process to seek individual assistance in the area of:
    • Academic Skills
    • Personal counseling
    • Student affairs processes
  • Describe purpose of Learning Community system.
  • Identify their Learning Community Scholar--Advisor as a resource.
  • Use CLEARvue to access and follow schedules.
  • Access and use iBooks.
  • Subscribe to the responsibilities of a student.
  • Describe financial aid issues arising in their personal transition to WMed.
  • Apply principles of financial planning in their life.
  • Interact with peers and scholar-advisor to recognize concerns in transition to masters program
  • Recognize the role of Emotional Intelligence and its role in professionalism.
  • Identify personality preferences attained through Myers-Briggs Type Indicator.
  • Summarize structure of the biomedical science curriculum.
  • Acquire general study strategies.
  • Establish time management skills.
  • Differentiate between fixed and growth mindset philosophy.
  • Participate in team building activities.
  • Participate in a series of activities designed to further acquaint them with staff/peers.
  • Allow students to explore the surrounding area, while maximizing the opportunity for integration amongst their peers and community alike.
  • Promote the importance of wellness for success in the masters program.
  • Write a reflective description after a meaningful experience.